The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol, developed by World Resources Institute (WRI) and World Business Council on Sustainable Development (WBCSD), sets the global standard for how to measure, manage, and report greenhouse gas emissions.

Hundreds of companies and organizations around the world are using GHG Protocol standards and tools to manage their emissions and become more efficient, resilient, and prosperous organizations.

Featured Content

Announcement: Facilitated Course for Policymakers and Practitioners Now Available
Designed for policymakers and practitioners developing economy-wide or sector-specific GHG reporting programs, the course Designing MRV Systems for Entity-Level Greenhouse Gas Emissions is now accepting enrolees for a facilitated online course, to take place Nov. 13 - Dec. 4, 2017.
10.26.2017  | Announcement
New Program Launched to Advance Local Climate Initiatives in Cities Worldwide
A new program to help advance local climate initiatives in cities worldwide was launched today. The City Climate Planner program is being led by the Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI) and was created by The World Bank Group along with C40 Cities, ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability, and World Resources Institute through funding provided by the Korea Green Growth Trust Fund.
10.19.2017  | Press Release
Greenhouse Gas Accounting: A Potential Tool for a Climate Smart Urban Development
With cities developing at a whirlwind pace, it's more urgent than ever to track the GHG emissions they are pumping into the atmosphere. In the August 2017 issue of TerraGreen, Aditi Phansalkar explores how frameworks including the Global Protocol for Community-Scale Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventories (GPC) are helping meet that challenge.
08.18.2017  | In the News
Fossil Fuels - What's at Risk?
Because the value of fossil fuel companies is based on the size of their reserves, it may seem counter-intuitive to see some of these assets as potential risks. But changes in market or economic conditions can make some reserves too expensive to tap, leaving them stranded – and their owners more vulnerable than the size of their reserves would indicate.
02.05.2017  | Blog post
New e-learning courses on the Policy and Action Standard and Mitigation Goal Standard
The GHG Protocol offers two new online courses for policymakers and analysts at either the national or local level. The courses are intended to help users understand the Policy and Action Standard and Mitigation Goal Standard and apply the standard to their specific circumstances.
06.04.2016  | Blog post
You, too, can master value chain emissions
For many businesses, value chain (scope 3) emissions account for more than 70 percent of their carbon footprint. Measuring and managing these emissions can motivate a company to do business with greener suppliers, improve the energy efficiency of its products, and rethink its distribution network -- measures that significantly reduce the overall impact on the climate.
04.04.2016  | Blog post
Top Ten Questions about the Scope 2 Guidance
On January 20, the GHG Protocol released the Scope 2 Guidance: an amendment to the Corporate Standard. It is the first major revision to the Corporate Standard in over 11 years. To help companies start implementing the Guidance, here are a few answers to the top ten questions you might have and where to find more information in the Guidance document.
03.18.2015  | Blog post
RELEASE: Launch of Two New Greenhouse Gas Standards to Improve Climate Policies, Design and Track Progress towards Mitigation Goals
For the first time, governments now have consistent, reliable methods to account for greenhouse gas reductions from their climate policies and goals. Today, the Greenhouse Gas Protocol launched two new standards to help governments design better policies and emissions reductions goals, and measure progress against them. 
11.18.2014  | Press Release
How to Calculate Policies’ Effects on Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Tunisia launched its renewable energy program, PROSOL ELEC, in 2010 to scale up solar photovoltaic systems in buildings throughout the country. The National Agency for Energy Conversation (ANME) anticipated that the greater use of solar power would help curb climate change, but experts didn’t quantify just how much the program would reduce the country’s greenhouse gas emissions.
11.18.2014  | Blog post