Issue 30

Dear Friends and Colleagues of the GHG Protocol,

Welcome to the final GHG Protocol newsletter of 2010. It has been a busy and productive two months for the team. The two new standards - the Product Accounting and Reporting Standard and the Corporate Value Chain (Scope 3) Accounting and Reporting Standard - were published for public comment. This public comment period is the final step in the development process and will be used to make additional revisions. The new standards are expected to be finalized by early 2011 and published in the spring of 2011.

The past two months also saw the release of The Greenhouse Gas Protocol for the U.S. Public Sector. This new Protocol is jointly authored by the GHG Protocol Initiative and LMI and outlines how federal, state and local governments can account for their greenhouse gas emissions. As a resource to help measure and manage climate impacts, the Protocol serves as a reference for implementing Executive Order 13514, which President Obama signed on October 5, 2009. The Executive Order requires federal agencies to report and reduce their GHG emissions over time.

To coincide with the release of the November newsletter, GHG Protocol has published a draft royalty-free Licensing Policy for public comment. GHG Protocol plans to integrate this agreement into all online calculation tools and standards in the New Year. Website visitors will be asked to sign-in before downloading all online tools and standards and will then be asked to accept or decline the license presented before them. The draft Licensing Policy is available on the website and GHG Protocol is making the Policy available for public comment for 30 days.

GHG Protocol is highlighting a new journal, published by Earthscan in cooperation with the Greenhouse Gas Management Institute. Greenhouse Gas Measurement & Management focuses on the infrastructure to support future GHG mitigation policies by providing a scholarly forum for both academic researchers and GHG professionals. Greenhouse Gas Measurement and Management is available free for academic institutions and NGOs for 2011. To request access, see the article below.

Finally, our November updates include information on new GHG Protocol guidelines in development that focus on green power products. We are also highlighting a new Carbon Middleware platform recently launched by Brighter Planet that is compliant with GHG Protocol. Please see below for further details on both of these updates.

As usual we welcome your feedback.

Best regards,

The WRI and WBCSD GHG Protocol Team

Top Stories

Launch of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol for the U.S. Public Sector

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol for the U.S. Public Sector was released in October by the GHG Protocol Initiative and LMI. The protocol outlines how federal, state and local governments can account for their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. As a resource to help measure and manage climate impacts, the protocol serves as a reference for implementing Executive Order 13514, which President Obama signed on October 5, 2009. The Executive Order requires federal agencies to report and reduce their GHG emissions over time.

GHG Protocol Publishes Draft Licensing Policy for Public Comment

GHG Protocol has published a draft royalty-free Licensing Policy and plans to integrate this agreement into all online calculation tools and standards in the New Year. GHG Protocol website visitors will be asked to sign-in before downloading all online tools and standards and will then be asked to accept or decline the license presented before them. Users will not be asked to accept the license every time they download tools and standards; a one-time review of the license is all that is required.

New Journal for 2011: Greenhouse Gas Measurement & Management

The world is now beginning to recognize the fundamental role of Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) to the success of any action to address climate change and the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause it. As the negotiations and legislative processes stutter, there is still an urgency to develop the infrastructure necessary to support real action. Further, despite an extensive literature on climate policy and technology, the literature on how best to manage GHG emissions is surprisingly limited.